Eurocrypt 2024

May 26-30, 2024

Zurich, Switzerland

Affiliated Events

The affiliated events will take place at ETH Zurich in the Hauptgebäude (HG) building on May 25-26, 2024. Every participant must register (including attendees, speakers, organizers, even if your fee is waived) through the Eurocrypt 2024 registration.

Saturday, May 25

Organizers: Krijn Reijnders (Radboud University Nijmegen), Jonathan Komada Eriksen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
Abstract:

The second edition of The Isogeny Club - Brainstorm Days will be an event where we together analyze several potential research ideas in isogeny-based cryptography. Participants can propose such ideas in the morning of the first day, and based on those ideas, several working groups hold brainstorming sessions on these ideas in the afternoon and morning of the following day. Finally, we wrap up with a quick presentation per group on the achieved results.

Organizers: Violetta Weger (Technical University of Munich), Anna-Lena Horlemann (University of St. Gallen), Jean-Christophe Deneuville (Ecole Nationale de l’Aviation Civile)
Abstract:

Code-based cryptography focuses on the study of cryptosystems that are based on hard problems from algebraic coding theory, following the seminal work of McEliece in the late 1970s. Due to the reopened standardization call by the NIST, the research in this direction has become one of the most pressing challenges.

The workshop aims at informing researchers across the community about the newest results in the field and fostering further collaborations. Besides bringing together the existing community, we provide an opportunity to extend the range of participation to researchers approaching this research area for the first time.

Organizers: Jonathan Bootle (IBM Research, Zürich), Elizabeth Crites (Web3 Foundation), Katerina Sotiraki (Yale University), Arantxa Zapico (Ethereum Foundation)
Abstract:

CrossFyre aims to bring together all people who identify as women and gender minorities in cyber security to promote their research topics, help them to develop their careers and create a space to discuss gender-related topics in cyber security.

The goal of the event is to create a network of early career research fellows, including post-docs, PhD students, as well as MSc and BSc students, and to provide mentoring opportunities with established researchers in the field of cyber security.

Organizers: Sandro Coretti-Drayton (IOG), Christian Matt (Primev), Björn Tackmann (DFINITY)
Abstract:

Over the last decade, projects working in the area of blockchains and distributed ledger technology (DLT) have developed many cryptographic protocols to market readiness which had existed almost exclusively in the academic research domain before. Quite arguably, significant recent advances in areas like non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs or threshold cryptography are directly or indirectly driven by the application-level requirements (and sometimes funding) coming from that space. The DLT space itself is, however, fractured, with different DLT ecosystems based on different philosophies and assumptions, and projects solving similar problems in very different ways.

The Workshop on Cryptographic Tools for Blockchain is a one-day event affiliated with Eurocrypt 2024 and aims to bring researchers working on cryptographic problems in different DLT ecosystems and related to different platforms together to discuss the latest approaches and results. The workshop will focus on submissions that cover cryptographic tools for DLTs, which includes but is not limited to the areas of non-interactive zero-knowledge proofs, threshold cryptography, identity, and multi-party computation, as well as the use of such cryptographic tools in DLT protocols.

Organizers: Nathan Manohar (IBM T.J. Watson Research Center)
Abstract:

Fully homomorphic encryption (FHE) is a cryptographic primitive with immense theoretical and practical interest. In the past 15 years, we have gone from the first theoretical constructions of FHE to constructions with implementation libraries that can be run on a laptop. Due to the large number of practical applications, FHE has become an emerging technology of interest in industry. The purpose of this workshop is to give attendees a broad overview of the current state of the art in FHE and discuss future research directions motivated by both theoretical and practical interests.

Organizers: Nico Döttling (CISPA Helmholz Center for Information Security), Sanjam Garg (UC Berkely), Giulio Malavolta (Bocconi University)
Abstract:

Laconic cryptography is an emerging paradigm that enables secure computation between potentially many senders and a "laconic" receiver. Abstractly, laconic cryptography can be thought of as a reverse delegation paradigm, where the party that does the computation is also the one that obtains the result. This approach enabled several new results such as identity-based encryption from new assumptions (CDH), rate-1 oblivious transfer, laconic function evaluation, and much more. In addition, techniques from laconic cryptography have been useful to build registration-based encryption (RBE), a new proposal to solve the key escrow problem in identity-based encryption.

This area has matured significantly over the past years, and many new primitives and applications have been proposed. Furthermore, very recent works have shown how to overcome the efficiency drawbacks of the initial constructions, opening the door for schemes that are tantalizingly close to practical. The objective of this workshop is to (i) cover foundational aspects of laconic cryptography, (ii) survey recent developments in the area, and (iii) identify outstanding challenges that remain to make laconic primitives truly practical.

Organizers: Sabine Oechsner (University of Edinburgh), François Dupressoir (University of Bristol)
Abstract:

Cryptographic reductions, simulations and security arguments are an important part of evaluating the (in)security of cryptographic algorithms and designs before they are realised—in standards, software and hardware. Despite the rich landscape of techniques used for reasoning about the security of primitives, constructions and interactive protocols, the cryptographic security proofs themselves are often seen as “attached” to the objects they relate to, and rarely studied as independent objects.

ProTeCS will aim at both celebrating cryptographic proofs as independent objects of study—further fostering the growth of the proof nerd community; and to discussing the techniques that bring such proofs to life in practice. In particular, we will focus on discussing coming challenges for cryptographic proof writers, from quantum reductions and simulation arguments to the need for scalable end-to-end proof techniques that apply all the way from core primitives to high-level security requirements.

In addition to invited talks, we ask for contributed talks from the community. Please see the website for further information: https://protecs-workshop.gitlab.io

Sunday, May 26

Organizers: Krijn Reijnders (Radboud University Nijmegen), Jonathan Komada Eriksen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
Abstract:

The second edition of The Isogeny Club - Brainstorm Days will be an event where we together analyze several potential research ideas in isogeny-based cryptography. Participants can propose such ideas in the morning of the first day, and based on those ideas, several working groups hold brainstorming sessions on these ideas in the afternoon and morning of the following day. Finally, we wrap up with a quick presentation per group on the achieved results.

Organizers: Violetta Weger (Technical University of Munich), Anna-Lena Horlemann (University of St. Gallen), Jean-Christophe Deneuville (Ecole Nationale de l’Aviation Civile)
Abstract:

Code-based cryptography focuses on the study of cryptosystems that are based on hard problems from algebraic coding theory, following the seminal work of McEliece in the late 1970s. Due to the reopened standardization call by the NIST, the research in this direction has become one of the most pressing challenges.

The workshop aims at informing researchers across the community about the newest results in the field and fostering further collaborations. Besides bringing together the existing community, we provide an opportunity to extend the range of participation to researchers approaching this research area for the first time.

Organizers: Julian Loss (CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security), Lucjan Hanzlik (CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security)
Abstract:

Privacy-preserving technologies are experiencing a renaissance with increased interest from researchers and practitioners.

This workshop aims to provide an introduction to cryptographers and practitioners interested in learning more about fundamental topics surrounding privacy. As such, it will cover the basics of important primitives such as blind signatures, oblivious PRFs, anonymous credentials, privacy-preserving tokens, and more. It will also serve as an overview of recent advances and publications for experts in the area.

The one-day workshop will include invited talks by experts, providing an overview of the state-of-the-art and recent advances in the area of privacy-preserving cryptography. The topic-specific talks will be preceded by an overview talk given by a distinguished speaker.

Organizers: Stjepan Picek (Radboud University), Lejla Batina (Radboud University), Luca Mariot (University of Twente)
Abstract:

Recently, the synergy between artificial intelligence (AI) and security has gained increasing prominence and significance. This evolution naturally arises from the need to enhance security with greater efficiency. Among the many areas of security benefiting from AI's integration, cryptography stands as a notable field. We are already witnessing the application of AI techniques to address several problems in cryptography, such as enhancing defenses against implementation attacks and hardware Trojans, and investigating attacks on Physical Unclonable Functions (PUFs). Beyond AI's contributions to cryptography, it is also possible to identify the use of cryptography to solve security and privacy issues in AI systems as an emerging and pivotal subject. The mounting frequency of AI system attacks urges us to explore potential research avenues involving cryptographic strategies to counteract these threats. Our objective is to convene experts from both academic and industrial backgrounds, each contributing to diverse facets of cryptography and AI, to facilitate knowledge exchange and foster collaborative efforts. Of particular interest is the exploration of the transferability of techniques across different cryptographic applications and the strengthening of AI security mechanisms. Furthermore, we will delve into recent developments, including those stemming from previous AICrypt events, to provide insights into the evolving landscape of this field.

Organizers: Matilda Backendal (ETH Zurich), Miro Haller (University of California, San Diego)
Abstract:

The Cryptographic Applications Workshop (CAW) focuses on the construction and analysis of cryptography built for practice. The program contains a mixture of invited and contributed talks on recent developments in the field of applied cryptography.

The main themes of CAW are

  1. formalizing security of deployed cryptography,
  2. constructing cryptographic primitives and systems for practice, and
  3. the industry perspective on cryptography.

Organizers: Mariya Georgieva Belorgey (Inpher), Sergiu Carpov (Inpher)
Abstract:

Secure multiparty computation (MPC), fully homomorphic encryption (FHE), federated learning (FL), trusted execution environments (TEEs) and differential privacy (DP) are prominent examples of emerging PETs. They enable the computation of a function without revealing the input data. By incorporating these techniques, organizations strike a balance between preserving the privacy of sensitive input data and deriving valuable insights from data analysis, optimizing the privacy-utility tradeoff.

This tutorial will walk you through these technologies and show how to combine them in order to implement a hybrid PETs use-case. In the practical session you will learn how to implement a complete and hybrid privacy-preserving machine learning workflow using different PETs tools and libraries for PSI, MPC, FHE amongst others.

Organizers: Tommaso Gagliardoni (Kudelski Security), Marco Macchetti (Kudelski Security), Sylvain Pelissier (Kudelski Security)
Abstract:

The rapidly evolving landscape of cryptography introduces growing complexities which make secure code implementation very challenging. This is especially problematic in the fast-moving Web3 world, where bleeding-edge cryptographic schemes are deployed to protect large amount of funds, but also in privacy-sensitive applications and secure communications. In this context, not only does understanding cryptographic theory matter, but so does the effective implementation and auditing of cryptographic code.

This one-day workshop, uniquely situated at the intersection of theoretical and applied cryptography, aims to provide an immersive learning experience in cryptographic code auditing informed by real-world examples. It targets professionals and researchers looking to deepen their understanding and sharpen their skills in secure cryptographic code auditing.

The day will start with a series of lectures by seasoned experts on various critical topics, including hash functions, block ciphers, randomness, zero-knowledge protocols, and multi-party computation schemes. The lectures will be enriched with case studies from past cryptographic audits conducted by our company for high-profile clients. In the afternoon, attendees will put their learning to the test in an engaging Capture The Flag (CTF) challenge. Participants will split into teams and strive to identify vulnerabilities in flawed code snippets provided by the organizers, submitting their findings via an online portal. The event will conclude with a solutions discussion, and winning teams will be announced and awarded at the conference's rump session.

The affiliated events venue

The affiliated events will take place in the Hauptgebäude (HG) building of ETH Zurich above the old town of Zurich. ETH Zurich HG is reachable in 5 minutes by tram (line 6 or 10 to "ETH/Universitätsspital") or 15 minutes by foot (uphill) from Zurich HB, but the most scenic way to get there is to take the Polybahn, a historic funicular railway that takes you from Central to Polyterrasse in front of HG (the ride is included in a zone 110 ticket).

Enter HG on the ground (E) floor from either Polyterrasse or Universitätstrasse and follow the signs to the E Nord foyer for the affiliated events' registration desk.

Affiliated Events Co-Chairs

eurocrypt2024workshops at iacr.org